Pausing

Something precious is lost if we rush headlong into the details of life without pausing for a moment to pay homage to the mystery of life and the gift of another day.

~ Kent Nerburn

As usual, it has been another busy week – catching up on rescheduled programs (due to our incredibly rainy fall), getting up wood from trees that came down in recent storms, and just living life. But, working where I do, there is always something that can make me pause and relish the moment, help me appreciate the beauty and mystery of my surroundings, and remind me of why I do what I do. Here are a few of those things from this past week…

Cope's gray treefrog juvenile, slightly larger individual

Cope’s Gray Treefrog, juvenile (click photos to enlarge)

We had a late season breeding of Cope’s Gray Treefrogs in our vernal pool and it seems the juveniles are everywhere in the garden right now. This one was hanging out in our daily plant sale area clinging to some flower pots.

Green lynx spider female with egg sac in green vegetation (hoode

Green Lynx Spider

This female Green Lynx Spider has lost one leg while guarding her egg sac (even though it hatched in early October). Unlike most of the late season lynx spiders I have seen, this one is still bright green (most turn a maroon-ish brown). But her egg sac was nestled in a group of hooded pitcher plants, which are still very green. I wonder if this species can alter their color late in the year to better match the egg sac surroundings?

Green treefrog

Green Treefrog

A co-worker alerted me to this chillin’ Green Treefrog, who stayed calm throughout its brief photo shoot, in spite of me manipulating its leaf bed for a better angle.

Green treefrog head view

Don’t bother me

Carolina anole juvenile

Carolina Anole

Most of the anoles I am seeing now are brown in color (color change is dependent on temperatures and hormones of the lizard), but this little guy was out in full sun and still bright green.

Variegated fritillary chrysalis

Variegated Fritillary chrysalis

Next to a passionflower tangle are a couple of chrysalids of two species of fritillary that use that vine as their caterpillar host plant. It is a bit ironic that the plainer of the two species (as an adult), the Variegated Fritillary, has a chrysalis that is much more striking than that of the beautiful Gulf Fritillary.

gulf fritillary chrysalis side view

Gulf Fritillary chrysalis

I am not sure whether Gulf Fritillaries overwinter as a chrysalis this far inland as they are a partial migratory species from further south and along our southeastern Coastal Plain. So, I was curious what this chrysalis would do. I watched it for a several days and was surprised how it changed position by twisting and turning, and then holding that new position for hours. It finally emerged on Friday.

Gulf fritillary after emergence 1

Freshly emerged Gulf Fritillary

Black swallowtail first instar - late!

Black swallowtail larva, early instar

One of the biggest surprises for me has been the presence of several Black Swallowtail caterpillars this late in the season. I have found a few last instar larva on the abundant Golden Alexander at work, but was amazed to see this first or second instar caterpillar on Friday. It is good to be reminded to take a moment to appreciate your surroundings, even when you have so many tasks at hand. Beauty and miracles surround us, wherever we may be. We just have to pause and enjoy.

8 thoughts on “Pausing

  1. Thank you sooooo much for your informative posts and the absolutely stunning photos (and humorous captions, as appropriate). I thought the lynx spider had lost two of her left front legs, but I may be mistaken. I look forward to reading your posts whenever you send them.

    • Hey Lori…you are right! I had photographed her a week before and she was only missing one leg at that time, and I didn’t even count for this last pic. In fact, the missing leg from the first time was caught in the silk surrounding the egg sac. Good spotting.

  2. wonderful images Mike…every one a treat to see, but I’m over the top about the Cope’s Gray Treefrog. I searched for the tree frog yesterday, but alas, never located the beauty.

  3. Thanks for the posting! I had been following the gulf fritillary chrysalis for more than a week but couldn’t come on Friday or Saturday – how wonderful that you saw the emergence! There may be a second chrysalis or it just looked closed up today. I had not seen the variegated fritillary chrysalis and went back today and was able to photograph it – so cool! I got photos of one of the anoles eating a bee this past week!

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