Savanna Sights

To think that plants ate insects would go against the order of nature…

~Carl Linnaeus

After a crazy busy spring field trip season at work, I am finally getting around to catching up on a couple of posts. Like last year, toward the end of April I collaborated with Melissa and the NC Museum of Natural Sciences to offer an educator workshop on carnivorous plants. We traveled to the Green Swamp and Holly Shelter, two of the hot spots for insect-eating plants in our state. Check out these earlier posts on these habitats, the variety of carnivorous plants they contain, and the marvelous Venus Flytrap. Since I covered a lot of information in those earlier posts, I’ll just share a few of the highlights from this year’s workshop.

carnivorous lants in green swamp

A trio of carnivores in the Green Swamp (click photos to enlarge)

Our first stop was one of the savannas in the Green Swamp. As we took off on the trail, someone found a snake shed and we stopped to admire the beauty of its patterns.

snake shed 1

Snake shed

snake shed

The beautiful patterns of a snake shed

We spent the afternoon in a longleaf pine savanna, enjoying the distinctive sound of wind through the pines and the filtered sunlight on the grasses and other beautiful plants found beneath our feet.

sundew

Pink sundew, Drosera capillaris

We stayed overnight in Wilmington, and, as we usually do on these workshops, offered an optional trip to the beach for sunrise before eating breakfast and heading over to Holly Shelter.

sunrise at beach

Sunrise did not disappoint

Willet feeding at sunrise

A willet feeding along the surf line at sunrise

Sanderling at sunrise 1

A sanderling rushing on the beach between waves at sunrise

Driving into the game lands, we stopped on a dry sand ridge to photograph a lupine alongside the road. But a bright green larva caught the eye of one participant and we were all distracted for a few moments, admiring this stout beauty.

Dark marathyssa or Roland's sallow?

My best guess is a Roalnd’s sallow caterpillar

Sandhills lupine whole plant view

Blue sandhill lupine, Lupinus diffusus

bullfrog

Bullfrog

The canals alongside the road proved to be a distraction as well with lots of turtles, frogs, and an American alligator.

Southern cricket frog

Southern cricket frog

alligator head

American alligator

Finally, we piled out of the vans and found a treasure trove of insect-eating plants, orchids, and other savanna species that have responded spectacularly to the regular prescribed burns.

studying flytraps

Workshop participants observing Venus flytraps

Flytraps and sundews

Venus flytraps and sundews covered the ground in places

Butterwort flowers

Flowers of blue butterwort, Pinguicula caerulea

Grass pink orchid

Bearded grass-pink orchid, Calopogon barbatus

rose pogonia orchid open flower 1

Rose pogonia orchid, Pogonia ophioglossoides

Orange milkwort

Orange milkwort, Polygala lutea

caterpillar in pitcher plant

Caterpillar living inside yellow pitcher plant

_

Distinctive bulls-eye in the web of a lined orbweaver

As we left the game lands, we stopped occasionally to look for red-cockaded woodpeckers (we saw plenty of nest cavities, but no birds on this day). One nice discovery was a ditch with another species of carnivorous plant – the bizarre little floating bladderwort.

Utricularia radiata?

Little floating bladderwort, Utricularia radiata

Utricularia radiata

Close up of inflated flotation structures

Our workshop concluded with a group of educators excited about the strange world of our state’s carnivorous plants and the incredibly diverse longleaf pine and pocosin habitats where they are found. Hopefully, their enthusiasm and new knowledge will help their students and colleagues better appreciate these unique features of our coastal plain.

Longleaf pine savanna

Longleaf pine savanna in Holly Shelter Game Lands

8 thoughts on “Savanna Sights

  1. Ho odd to see them in the ground. None are native here, and the only ones that I have ever seen were potted in conservatories, mainly the Conservatory of Flowers in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco.

  2. Lovely! I was just looking at the same plants today at the NC Bot Garden. Very cool to see them on their home ground.

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