Developing, in a Pool Near You…

Every child should have mud pies, grasshoppers, water bugs, tadpoles, frogs, mud turtles, elderberries, wild strawberries, acorns , chestnuts, trees to climb…and any child who has been deprived of these has been deprived of the best part of education.

~Luther Burbank

The arrival of spring is a stop and go affair here in central North Carolina. Warm, sunny days, rain, then a windy cold front, and back again. But, the early harbingers of spring (spring wildflowers, the first pollinators, lusty amphibians, etc.) have a duty, and so they persist. Among the most dutiful are the upland chorus frogs, Pseudacris feriarum. I shared an intimate froggy moment of amplexus in an earlier post a few weeks ago. In case you missed it, here it is again…

Upland chorus frogs in amplexus

Upland chorus frogs in amplexus in mid-February (click photos to enlarge)

These tiny songsters have been calling and courting since early February in various pools at work (NC Botanical Garden). They normally prefer temporary (vernal) pools that often dry up in summer, making them unsuitable for fish. This year they are also breeding in our Turtle Pond, a permanent small pond that is loaded with tadpole predators, especially mosquitofish. So, I pulled one of the egg masses out and brought it inside to photograph, with plans to release them in one of the nearby vernal pools before they transform into frogs.

Upland Chorus frog eggs

Upland chorus frog egg mass

This species utilizes a wide variety of breeding sites, from natural vernal pools to water-filled tire ruts and roadside ditches. Females lay several small egg masses, each containing 50-100 eggs on average (this can vary greatly) for a total of about 1000 eggs each season. She usually attaches them to vegetation or a twig under the water.

Upland chorus frog egg mass near hatching

Tadpoles almost ready to emerge

The eggs hatch within about a week, with the embryos transforming rapidly from a round blob to elongate stylized tadpoles. The ones in my office window started hatching on a Friday afternoon.

Newly hatched tadpole

Hanging out after hatching

When I went in that Saturday, most were hanging vertically in the small aquarium like tiny cream-colored mummies. Look closely and you can see some tiny filaments off one side of the lower edge of the head region. I assume these are the external gills, which only last a few days after hatching in most tadpoles.

Upland chorus frog tadpoles after 2 days plus copepod

Two days old

On Monday, the now two-day old critters were changing color and looked a lot more like tiny tadpoles. Note how the head region has enlarged, and how you can now clearly see their insides, darkening eyes, and mouth (the photo above is of their ventral side). Also note the tiny zooplankton (a copepod with egg sacs) swimming just to the right of the upper tadpoles’ tail tip. I am amazed at how much tiny life I collected when I dipped up a small bucket of water from Turtle Pond.

Upland chorus frog tadpole 1 week old 1

Four days old and growing

Another couple of days go by and they are changing rapidly – darkening in color, adding subtle gold flecking, getting larger, and swimming more vigorously. These tadpoles should transform into juvenile frogs in 6 to 8 weeks, depending on temperature and food availability.

Upland chorus frog egg 4 days after hatching 1

Grazing on algae

I will probably let most of them go this coming week, and hang onto just a couple in hopes of watching the rest of this amazing metamorphosis.

Upland chorus frog tadpole 6 daysold

Six days old and counting

3 thoughts on “Developing, in a Pool Near You…

  1. Pingback: In a pond near you | Pete's Favourite Things

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s